FOSTERING GENERAL EDUCATION TEACHERS AWARENESS ON INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS: A REVIEW STUDY


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Authors

  • Baiju THOMAS Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda Educational and Research institute

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.12536377

Keywords:

Fostering, General Education Teachers, Awareness, Inclusive Education, Students with Special Educational Needs, and Review Study.

Abstract

The present study fosters general education teachers (GET) awareness on inclusive education (IE) for students with special education needs (SwSENs). Everyone has the right to an equal education, including students with SENs. However, when it came to the actual concept of IE, there was an obvious awareness gap between general education teachers with more and less experience; however, there was a knowledge gap regarding the legal requirements for IE, basic information about children with SENs, or the skills and competencies needed to implement IE. Access to education and learning opportunities is ensured for all students through IE, including those with SENs. A student is considered to have special educational needs when they require individualised support while learning. IE approaches include a wide range of practices, such as adapted classrooms settings, inclusive teaching strategies, and providing students with the same assistance and instruction as their peers in a regular grade-level classroom. Everyone should have access to IE's benefits, especially students with SENs. It may be necessary for various experts to work together to address potential further issues, such as exploitation. To instil in young minds the values of optimism and tolerance, IE is essential in the fight for a world devoid of discrimination. Improving children's complete education is IE's primary focus, along with its practical benefits and drawbacks. We actively encourage diversity awareness and appreciation at IE to foster acceptance, tolerance, and understanding among our varied student body. Even with its advantages, IE may face educational equity and diversity obstacles. Despite all the challenges, GET will successfully implement IE for students with SENs.

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Published

2024-06-25

How to Cite

THOMAS, B. (2024). FOSTERING GENERAL EDUCATION TEACHERS AWARENESS ON INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS: A REVIEW STUDY. NEW ERA INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTERDISCIPLINARY SOCIAL RESEARCHES, 9(24), 54–61. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.12536377

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